The city of Queensland runs out of water after a Chinese company gave it the green light to extract water from the area

A city devastated by drought ran out of water only weeks after a Chinese company was approved to administer a commercial water extraction facility in the region.

Stanthorpe, in the southern Downs of Queensland, now completely depends on 42 trucks full of water per day brought from a dam 60 km north.

The local dam for the city of 5,000 people has been reduced to only 11 percent of its capacity, and those living in Stanthorpe are limited to 80 liters of water per person per day.

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The Storm King dam, which recedes and is severely dry, is shown near Stanthorpe. The city council has now been forced to transport 42 trucks full of water per day from a dam 60 km north

The Storm King dam, which recedes and is severely dry, is shown near Stanthorpe. The city council has now been forced to transport 42 trucks full of water per day from a dam 60 km north

The Southern Downs Regional Council tightened water restrictions last month just one day after approving the development of a mining operation 40 km away in the border town of Cherrabah, Queensland.

The ‘full-time water transport’ from Connolly Dam consists of 1.3 megaliters per day and Mayor Tracy Dobie said the operation is the largest of its kind by an Australian local government.

‘Now we have started the complete transport of water by truck. There are 14 trucks that make three trips a day, ” he said.

‘The Council promised the community that we would not run out of water.

‘The initial stages of water transport went extremely well and without incident. We will now move to full-time water transportation to provide water to the Stanthorpe ‘region.

The remaining local reserves will be retained for emergency use.

Despite the importation of water, the 80-liter restriction will remain in effect, four times less than the average individual water consumption of 340 liters per day, according to Riverina Water.

Cr Dobie said other measures to maintain the water supply could involve a pipeline to Toowoomba and Warwick, north of Stanthorpe.

The desperate situation in the southeast of the state stood out even more last year when a neighbor who suffered problems with Stanthorpe was robbed of 70,000 liters of drinking water.

Andrew Todd, 61, caused thieves to attack his Stanthorpe property in southeast Queensland three times for five months, stealing a massive amount of water.

Despite the new importation of water, a water restriction of 80 liters per person per day will be maintained for Stanthorpe residents (an earlier and more forgiving restriction of 100 liters in the city in October)

Despite the new importation of water, a water restriction of 80 liters per person per day will be maintained for Stanthorpe residents (an earlier and more forgiving restriction of 100 liters in the city in October)

Todd told Courier Mail that he had installed a new water tank and sent water about five months ago.

While he is not angry with the neighbors, he said he feels sympathy for them and would have happily helped them if they were desperate.

‘It is very sad. Now you have to close your doors, ” said Todd.

Last month, a Chinese company was granted approval to administer a commercial water extraction facility in the region devastated by the drought in southern Queensland (the Storm King Dam is represented near Stanthorpe in the area in October )

Last month, a Chinese company was granted approval to administer a commercial water extraction facility in the region devastated by the drought in southern Queensland (the Storm King Dam is represented near Stanthorpe in the area in October )

Then, in mid-December, the Southern Downs Regional Council approved the development of the mining operation about 40 km away in Cherrabah, on the border with New South Wales.

In a cruel turn, those who lived in Stanthorpe and Warwick, to the north, saw their water restrictions reduced to 80 liters per person just one day after the approval of water mining.

The council has told its taxpayers that the restriction translates into no more than 90 seconds of shower time with a shower head not water efficient.

Those who live near the site that Joyful View, which is owned by two Chinese investors, will exploit the council’s decision, given the decline in supplies in the region.

The council has told its taxpayers that the new restriction translates into no more than 90 seconds of shower time with a shower head not water efficient

The council has told its taxpayers that the new restriction translates into no more than 90 seconds of shower time with a shower head not water efficient

“I don’t understand how it is allowed to happen,” a resident told The Guardian.

“If that water drains from shallow aquifers, it affects our long-term viability.”

The company plans to transport the water to a Gold Coast bottling plant, according to council documents.

According to reports, the council is aware of landowners who send water outside the region, according to the local Southern Free Times.

An aerial view of a dry dam in the Cottonvale apple orchard, outside Stanthorpe, devastated by drought. The jarring image was selected as one of the best news images of the year for 2019

An aerial view of a dry dam in the Cottonvale apple orchard, outside Stanthorpe, devastated by drought. The jarring image was selected as one of the best news images of the year for 2019

But the vice mayor of the region said they had no power to intervene and could not regulate the extraction by private companies.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Joyful View and the Southern Downs Regional Council for comments.

Last month, Stanthorpe received 200,000 liters of water and 130 tons of bales of hay in a huge emergency supply package from the Muslim community in Australia.

The delivery was organized by Muslim Aid Australia with donations from thousands of people and companies across the country.

“There are cattle dying, horses dying or they have to be sold because they don’t have bales of hay to eat or water to drink,” said MAA spokesman Riyaad Ally.

Local retirees were seen welcoming the delivery trucks when they arrived and running to help unload the bales of hay from the trailers.

Last month, Stanthorpe received 200,000 liters of water and 130 tons of bales of hay in a huge emergency supply package from the Muslim community in Australia.

Last month, Stanthorpe received 200,000 liters of water and 130 tons of bales of hay in a huge emergency supply package from the Muslim community in Australia.

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