The ballerina of the Royal Ballet School, fit and healthy, aged 14, died after contracting a rare form of meningitis

The dancer of the Royal Ballet School, “ fit and healthy ”, 14, died after contracting a rare form of meningitis during the Christmas holidays in Sardinia

  • Valentina Sanna died on New Year’s Day after fighting meningitis.
  • The Royal Ballet dancer told her parents she was suffering from a headache.
  • The symptoms of the 14-year-old girl got worse and then spent three days in the hospital.

A “ fit and healthy ” dancer from the Royal Ballet School suddenly died on New Year’s Day after contracting a rare form of meningitis during holidays in Sardinia.

Valentina Sanna, who was described as “one of the best in her class,” had told her parents that she had a headache on boxing day.

Crosby’s 14-year-old dancer, Merseyside, died on January 1 after fighting the disease in the hospital for three days.

Valentina, very dear, was described as “extremely kind and extremely beautiful” by her devastated father Alberto.

Valentina Sanna (pictured) was described as “extremely kind and extremely beautiful” by her devastated father Alberto

The 14-year-old dancer (pictured above) was described by her father as “extremely elegant and elegant.”

Dr. Sanna, 48, said he, his wife and two other daughters were devastated, but added that the family had been “lucky to have her for 14 years.”

Valentina was a talented dancer and trained up to six days a week at the Procter Dance Academy in Crosby and her ability led her to earn a place at the Royal Ballet School.

Dr. Sanna, who is a professional musician, said his daughter was “extremely elegant and elegant” and that it was something everyone would notice in her.

‘People noticed how he used to walk on tiptoe in a room. She was very kind and very gentle. We thought she was very musical. She was always perfectly synchronized and was really beautiful. ‘

Valentina shows up in a dancer pose by the pool while on vacation with her family

Valentina shows up in a dancer pose by the pool while on vacation with her family

Valentina shows up in a dancer pose by the pool while on vacation with her family

Far from dancing, Dr. Sanna said that Valentina was academically “one of the best in her class” and that she had a good group of friends.

Dr. Sanna said: ‘She loved and loved her very much. We could not have asked for more, life will be very different without it.

His sudden death came “completely unexpected,” he added.

In addition to this, Valentina extended her grace and donated her organs, saving the lives of four young people.

His father said he relieved his pain by knowing that someone else was getting a new life.

The family had traveled to Sardinia, where the family is from, for their annual Christmas trip before Valentina said she wasn’t feeling well.

He showed flu-like symptoms, Dr. Sanna said, and had complained of having a headache on boxing day.

When her symptoms began to get worse, her family took her to the hospital on December 29.

Dr. Sanna said: “It was clear immediately that this should be treated urgently, so they started immediately with antibiotics.”

Valentina died on New Year’s Day.

Dr. Sanna thanks his friends and family for the support, after the death of his daughter.

The family hopes to establish a charity to honor Valentina’s commitment to dance and remember her. They are currently running a Liverpool-based music charity that helps provide free music lessons to young people in the area.

What is meningitis?

Meningitis is the inflammation of the membranes that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord.

Anyone can be affected, but people at risk include people under five, 15 to 24, and over 45.

People exposed to passive smoking or with the suppressed immune system, such as patients receiving chemotherapy, are also at greater risk.

The most common forms of meningitis are bacterial and viral.

Symptoms for both include:

  • Pale and stained skin with a rash that does not fade when compressed with a glass.
  • Neck stiffness
  • Aversion to bright lights
  • Fever and cold hands and feet.
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness
  • Intense headache
Headache is one of the main symptoms.

Headache is one of the main symptoms.

Headache is one of the main symptoms.

Bacterial meningitis

Bacterial meningitis requires urgent treatment in the hospital with antibiotics.

About 10 percent of bacterial cases are fatal.

Of those who survive, one in three suffer complications, including brain damage and hearing loss.

Limb amputation is a possible side effect if septicemia (blood poisoning) occurs.

Vaccines are available against certain strains of bacteria that cause meningitis, such as tuberculosis.

Viral meningitis

The virus rarely endangers life, but it can cause lasting effects, such as headaches, fatigue and memory problems.

Thousands of people suffer from viral meningitis every year in the United Kingdom.

The treatment focuses on hydration, pain relievers and rest.

Although it is not effective, antibiotics can be given when patients arrive at the hospital in case they suffer the bacterial form of the disease.

Source: Meningitis Now

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