Rachel Riley, Jonathan Ross and Steven Gerrard help raise £ 250,000 for teens with brain cancer

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Several celebrities, including Rachel Riley, Steven Gerrard and Jonathan Ross, helped a teenage girl raise £ 250,000 to save her best friend after she was diagnosed with brain cancer.

The celebrities, who also include Alfie Allen of Game of Thrones, joined the grassroots campaign that secured a whopping £ 180,000 in just two days to help pay for an experimental brain tumor treatment.

The One Pound Warriors Facebook page was launched by Lillie Cotgrove, 13, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex, Benfleet, Essex, to raise money for her best friend Lily Wythe, 14.

And some of Britain’s most famous faces shared their request for help to their millions of followers on social networks.

She asked for massive donations of £ 1 to pay for a clinical trial of £ 300,000 in Seattle, United States, that could help Lily overcome a ‘universally deadly’ disease she was diagnosed with last year.

Lily Wythe in the hospital after her diagnosis. She is suffering from a 'universally fatal' brain cancer

Lily Wythe in the hospital after her diagnosis. She is suffering from a ‘universally fatal’ brain cancer

The One Pound Warriors Facebook page was launched by Lillie Cotgrove, 13, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex, Benfleet, Essex, to raise money for Lilly

The One Pound Warriors Facebook page was launched by Lillie Cotgrove, 13, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex, Benfleet, Essex, to raise money for Lilly

The One Pound Warriors Facebook page was launched by Lillie Cotgrove, 13, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex, Benfleet, Essex, to raise money for Lilly

Rachel Riley, Alfie Allen, Steven Gerrard and Jonathan Ross have helped raise money for an experimental operation to save her

Rachel Riley, Alfie Allen, Steven Gerrard and Jonathan Ross have helped raise money for an experimental operation to save her

Rachel Riley, Alfie Allen, Steven Gerrard and Jonathan Ross have helped raise money for an experimental operation to save her

His mother Diane, 40, and his father Martin, 41, had managed to raise about £ 80,000 for treatment before January 16, before Lillie got involved.

Two days later, donations had increased to £ 250,000.

Diane said: ‘We started crowdfunding and by Thursday last week the total was £ 78,000.

‘Since the one-pound Warriors of Lillie went into action, the fundraiser has gone crazy. Lily is impressed by everything. He can’t believe we’re almost there.

Her parents first saw that her daughter was sick when she became unusually anxious about her family vacation in Spain.

It was later revealed that mood swings were, in fact, the first signs of a rare cancer that affected the brainstem.

After doctors initially told him that he was suffering from hormonal migraines, they were told that his condition was probably terminal.

Tragically, the tumor and the ravages of radiotherapy have left Lily unable to use the left side of her body, and she has had to learn to eat and walk again.

But instead of taking the advice of “going home and making memories,” the parents promised to take their daughter to the United States for experimental immunotherapy treatment.

The couple faced a race against time to raise £ 300,000 for a clinical trial that begins in March.

Now, thanks to the increase in donations, they are approaching their goal, but they have urged officials to obtain more funds to investigate the treatment of rare cancer after receiving the news that all parents fear.

The heads of charities have joined their calls for British clinical trials, as the family deals with “the cruelest diagnosis.”

Diane, an esthetician, has pledged to never give up her fight against the inoperable diffuse intrinsic pontino glioma (DIPG) that is growing in her daughter’s brainstem.

The couple faced a race against time to raise £ 300,000 for a clinical trial that begins in March, before the celebrity-backed campaign helped them

The couple faced a race against time to raise £ 300,000 for a clinical trial that begins in March, before the celebrity-backed campaign helped them

The couple faced a race against time to raise £ 300,000 for a clinical trial that begins in March, before the celebrity-backed campaign helped them

Lily imagined wearing an eye patch after suffering double vision due to the tumor

Lily imagined wearing an eye patch after suffering double vision due to the tumor

Lily imagined wearing an eye patch after suffering double vision due to the tumor

Diane, an esthetician, has pledged to never give up her fight against inoperable diffuse intrinsic pontino glioma (DIPG) that is growing on her daughter's brainstem

Diane, an esthetician, has pledged to never give up her fight against inoperable diffuse intrinsic pontino glioma (DIPG) that is growing on her daughter's brainstem

Diane, an esthetician, has pledged to never give up her fight against inoperable diffuse intrinsic pontino glioma (DIPG) that is growing on her daughter’s brainstem

She said: ‘We’re just trying to make sense of this new normal.

“We need Lily to participate in a clinical trial, since there is nothing more the NHS can do apart from one more dose of radiation therapy.”

‘We are extremely positive people. I couldn’t leave it there, I had to find people who survived and other options.

“We will not give up, any parent would do the same.”

She added: “ We returned from our vacation in August and noticed that Lily was a bit strange while we were away.

“He didn’t behave as he normally would, he was quite emotionally sensitive and quite anxious.”

“ Looking back, we can say that it was like this for four or six months before, however, it may not be related, it is difficult to say that you expect changes with teenagers.

“When she first presented with headaches and illnesses, we simply attributed it to her age and being a teenager.”

Now the family has launched a fundraising campaign for the experimental treatment of Car-T that could completely eliminate cancer. The treatment works by taking a patient's white blood cells and programming them to specifically attack a tumor

Now the family has launched a fundraising campaign for the experimental treatment of Car-T that could completely eliminate cancer. The treatment works by taking a patient's white blood cells and programming them to specifically attack a tumor

Now the family has launched a fundraising campaign for the experimental treatment of Car-T that could completely eliminate cancer. The treatment works by taking a patient’s white blood cells and programming them to specifically attack a tumor

When they returned from Malaga, Diane and her husband, a civil engineer, repeatedly took her to the doctors, just to be told that she had migraines, ear infections and hormonal headaches.

It was only when an optician recommended an MRI that the extent of his illness was revealed, and he was referred to Great Ormond Street, who gave him the tragic news that he could not be treated.

Reliving the tragic moment, his mother said: ‘I didn’t believe it, I just thought that today they could do something.

We were talking to one of the best neurosurgeons there, how can it be possible?

They said it was universally fatal and that I would almost always come back, you can imagine disbelief.

“We got on the train to go home and I couldn’t believe that the whole world was still around us when ours seemed to have stopped.”

It has been used in the United Kingdom to treat leukemia, but it has not been tested for brain cancer.

It has been used in the United Kingdom to treat leukemia, but it has not been tested for brain cancer.

It has been used in the United Kingdom to treat leukemia, but it has not been tested for brain cancer.

Now the family has launched a fundraising campaign for the experimental treatment of Car-T that could completely eliminate cancer.

The treatment works by taking a patient’s white blood cells and programming them to specifically attack a tumor.

In Lily’s case, supercharged cells would be pumped directly to her brainstem to target the cancerous region and use the body’s own systems to fight disease.

It has been used in the United Kingdom to treat leukemia, but it has not been tested for brain cancer.

Asking for more funds for research, Diane said: ‘The NHS needs to do more, since there is something like one percent of the funds that go to this type of brain tumor.

“They don’t have enough funds, but it’s disappointing that they don’t offer immunotherapy on the NHS.”

‘Everyone has been fantastic and we have probably dealt with some of the best trained people, it’s nothing personal for them.

“They don’t have enough funds and there isn’t enough knowledge about Lily’s cancer.”

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