Home Health Kentucky teenager refusing to let the chickenpox vaccine SUES get his school

Kentucky teenager refusing to let the chickenpox vaccine SUES get his school

Kentucky teenager refusing to receive the chickenpox vaccine & # 39; because it contains degraded fetal cells & # 39; SUES is a school because he excluded him from basketball training and lessons

  • Jerome Kunkel is an 18-year-old senior and basketball captain at a Catholic school in Walton
  • He objects to vaccines because he believes they contain & # 39; degraded fetal cells & # 39;
  • Experts say that this theory is a major cause of measles outbreak in the Russian-speaking community in Washington State
  • Some vaccines are derived from a small sample of cells from two fetuses of elective abortions in the early sixties
  • Pope Benedict XVI has determined that all vaccines are morally acceptable, regardless of where they come from, because they protect children from suffering
  • But many Catholics still hesitate to vaccinate
  • Kunkel's attitude means that he is banned from lessons and extracurricular activities at the Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Academy / Assumption
  • The province is undergoing an outbreak of 32 people

A Kentucky teenager who refuses to receive the chickenpox vaccine on religious grounds is suing his school for excluding him from basketball training.

Jerome Kunkel, an 18-year-old senior and basketball captain at a Walton Catholic school, objects to vaccines because he believes they contain & # 39; aborted fetal cells & # 39 ;.

But his position means that he is automatically prevented from completing his final term of lessons and extracurricular activities at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart / Assumption Academy in the midst of an outbreak of 32 people.

The Northern Kentucky Health Department announced last week that 21 days after the result of the last sick student or staff member, all non-vaccinated students are not allowed to attend school. & # 39;

Jerome Kunkel is an 18-year-old senior and basketball captain at a Catholic school in Walton. He objects to vaccines because he believes they contain & # 39; degraded fetal cells & # 39 ;. His point of view means that he has banned the last lesson period and extracurricular activities with Our Lady of the Sacred Heart / Assumption Academy (file image)

Kunkel's lawyer said he was approached by the families of 18 other children in similar situations

Kunkel's lawyer said he was approached by the families of 18 other children in similar situations

THE CATHOLIC PROBLEM WITH VACCINS

In the early 1960s, cells were obtained from two fetuses after two elective abortions – one in England, one in Sweden – neither of which was performed for vaccine development.

That small sample cell was used to help grow viruses in the laboratory, which were then developed into vaccines to immunize the general public.

These fibroblast cells (and no others) are still used today to make five different vaccines: rubella, hepatitis A, varicella (for chickenpox), shingles and one for rabies.

Scientists used fetal cells for a number of reasons. Firstly, animal cells are less effective (some say ineffective) for growing viruses that infect humans. Secondly, cells divide during the growth process and eventually die. However, fetal cells can divide more times before they die.

As a result, some Catholics are reluctant about vaccinations because abortions are considered a sin worthy of excommunication.

The National Catholic Bioethics Center encourages people to get vaccines that are not derived from these cells.

However, Pope Benedict XVI, formerly head of the Pontifical Academy for Life, judged that it was morally acceptable for parents to give these vaccines to their children despite their origins, as Catholics believe in protecting children from suffering, harm and death .

Kunkel fumed: & # 39; The fact that I can't finish my last year of basketball, like our last few games, is pretty devastating. I mean, you've been in high school for four years, playing basketball, but you're looking forward to your last year, & CNN reported.

Students in Kentucky have the legal right to skip vaccines on religious grounds if they give a declaration of honor, as Kunkel did last year.

However, the school maintains that this does not mean that the children have the right to be on public grounds.

Chickenpox is highly contagious, but those who have the Varicella vaccine are immunized against it.

Chris Wiest, Kunkel's lawyer, said he was approached by the families of 18 other children in similar situations.

Kunkel's position on vaccines is based on the history of how certain strains were developed.

In the early 1960s, cells were obtained from two fetuses after two elective abortions – one in England, one in Sweden – neither of which was performed for vaccine development.

That small sample cell was used to help grow viruses in the laboratory, which were then developed into vaccines to immunize the general public.

These fibroblast cells (and no others) are still used today to make five different vaccines: rubella, hepatitis A, varicella (for chickenpox), shingles and one for rabies.

Scientists used fetal cells for a number of reasons. Firstly, animal cells are less effective (some say ineffective) for growing viruses that infect humans. Secondly, cells divide during the growth process and eventually die. However, fetal cells can divide more times before they die.

As a result, some Catholics are reluctant about vaccinations because abortions are considered a sin worthy of excommunication.

The National Catholic Bioethics Center encourages people to get vaccines that are not derived from these cells.

However, Pope Benedict XVI, formerly head of the Pontifical Academy for Life, judged that it was morally acceptable for parents to give these vaccines to their children despite their origins, as Catholics believe in protecting children from suffering, harm and death .

The health department responded to the lawsuit: & The recent actions of the Northern Kentucky Health Department regarding the chickenpox outbreak in the Our Lady of the Sacred Heart / Assumption Academy were a direct response to a threat to public health and a appropriate and necessary response to prevent further spread of this infectious disease.

Students in Kentucky have the legal right to skip vaccines on religious grounds if they give a declaration of honor, as Kunkel did last year. However, the school maintains that this does not mean that the children have the right to be on public grounds

Students in Kentucky have the legal right to skip vaccines on religious grounds if they give a declaration of honor, as Kunkel did last year. However, the school maintains that this does not mean that the children have the right to be on public grounds

.

Must Read

Manchester United – Manchester City: Premier League – live! | Football

08:59 BST20:59 Roy Keane says the key to this game could be United's ability to get Kompany one-on-one. "He has a yellow card and his...

Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen told Tom Arnold that of the crimes he confessed to plea deal were 'a lie'

Recordings released by actor Tom Arnold reportedly reveal former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen telling Arnold that the crimes he confessed in order to secure...

Elysium. Macron restarts the machine to deregulate working time

The controversy of the last few weeks about hours of work was not innocent. This Thursday, at the occasion of his closing press conference...