I die of cancer, but the worst thing was to tell my children: & # 39; Dad might die & # 39;

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NO parents should tell their children that they may not be alive to see them grow up.

But dad of three Trevor Wood has not had an option.

    Pats-of-three Trevor Woods thought he had a bladder infection when he fell ill last October

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Pats-of-three Trevor Woods thought he had a bladder infection when he fell ill last OctoberCredit: SWNS: South West News Service
    It soon became apparent that he was living with an aggressive brain cancer

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It soon became apparent that he was living with an aggressive brain cancerCredit: SWNS: South West News Service

He thought he had a bladder infection until he started suffering from paralyzing migraines.

It turned out that he had glioblastoma – the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

Surgeons spent eight hours removing 90 percent of the tumor, but were forced to leave the rest because it was wrapped around delicate blood vessels.

Despite the vow to beat it, days after the operation, Trevor, from Rayleigh, Essex, was told that he still had a maximum of two years to live.

Fragile and very weak, Trevor and wife Leanne, had to pass on the news to their three children Dani (17), Keria (12) and Bobby (9): "There is a good chance that dad will die because he is very bad now."

    Shortly after being told that he still had a maximum of two years to live, he had to tell his children

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Shortly after being told that he still had a maximum of two years to live, he had to tell his childrenCredit: SWNS: South West News Service
    He said that there was

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He said there were "no words" to describe that he had to tell his family the newsCredit: SWNS: South West News Service

Trevor began to feel unwell for the first time in October, but did not go to his doctor for six weeks.

Halfway through November he started to get a daily headache and was eventually diagnosed with a virus.

But when the migraine became "unbearable", doctors booked him in for a CT scan.

Awaiting the results, Trevor's condition deteriorated and he started vomiting.

That is when he "just knew" that he is a brain tumor.

After rushing to A & E in Southend, doctors discovered he had a serious swelling in the brain and later an MRI confirmed that he had glioblastoma and a cyst that had grown around it.

Fearing that removing the entire fate would lead to a stroke, surgeons left 10 percent of the cancers behind.

And two days after his surgery, Trevor was told that he still had one to two years to live.

    Surgeons removed 90% of the tumor, but were forced to leave 10%

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Surgeons removed 90% of the tumor, but were forced to leave 10%Credit: SWNS: South West News Service
    They have warned him that the cancer will grow back and that surgery will not be an option next time

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They have warned him that the cancer will grow back and that surgery will not be an option next timeCredit: SWNS: South West News Service
    So Trevor is currently undergoing his second chemo attack

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So Trevor is currently undergoing his second chemo attackCredit: SWNS: South West News Service

He said: "After the operation, I knew for sure that we were rid of the cancer.

"My whole world collapsed and I cried two days in a row.

"He thinned me out and would get worse because Leanne and I had to tell the children and reassure them."

The father then had chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a month before taking a break and started a new six-month chemo cycle.

He is now halfway through the second round and has to perform an MRI scan every six months.

Documents have warned his family that the tumor will come back and that surgeons have said they will no longer operate "unless they absolutely must."

The crushing news has destroyed the Trevor family.

    He recently brought his family to West Ham as part of his efforts to make the best of the time they have left

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He recently brought his family to West Ham as part of his efforts to make the best of the time they have leftCredit: SWNS: South West News Service
    Mrs. Leanne says:

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Mrs. Leanne says: "I still hope that we grow old together, as we always say to each other."Credit: SWNS: South West News Service

"It was absolutely heartbreaking to tell them," Trevor said.

"It's hard to describe the feeling when your whole world is falling apart.

"At that time you have to tell your children that there is a good chance it will kill me.

"There are no words to describe that kind of pain."

But Trevor doesn't give up.

He said he had two choices – wait for his cancer to kill him, or "fight back."

"You get up and think – & # 39; you know what, I'm going to beat this. & # 39;

"Something is coming over you, bigger than you, that you know you have to do.

"I'm a super competitive guy anyway, so I'm determined to be the first person to get to the other side of this tumor and beat it.

"This brain cancer has chosen the wrong head to fight with."

Symptoms of glioblastoma

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

It is usually difficult to treat and often there is no cure, but the treatment can slow its progression.

Symptoms can be:

  • headache
  • nausea or vomiting
  • amnesia
  • difficulty with balance
  • bladder problems
  • vision problems

Leanne, who has been with Trevor for 18 years, said that she is "in absolute pieces and that I am slowly falling apart".

& # 39; I usually notice that Trevor supports me and the children, & # 39; she explained.

Eer Frankly, it's hell for all of us, I don't know how he stays positive.

& # 39; Except for the huge scar on his crown, you wouldn't know he's dying. & # 39;

She said that Trevor is "everything" – "the best husband, the best father my children could ever have".

"I can't imagine my life without him and I pray every day that he will beat this cancer.

"I still hope that together we will grow old, as we always say to each other."

    Trevor now hopes to see the Northern Lights in Norway this winter and to bring his family to Florida

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Trevor now hopes to see the Northern Lights in Norway this winter and to bring his family to FloridaCredit: SWNS: South West News Service

After months of life-prolonging treatment, Trevor is determined to collect as many memories as possible with his family in the time he has left.

He has a number of things that he is determined to do while he is good enough.

In March, the lifelong Hammers fan went to the West Ham stadium with his entire family for the first time.

Last Sunday, he participated in the Southend Half Marathon, raised £ 1800 for Macmillan Cancer Support and ran 13.5 kilometers in 2.5 hours.

Trevor now hopes to see the Northern Lights from Norway this summer and bring his children to Disney World in Florida.

Trevor said, "It's not about thinking that the worst is behind you – we don't know for sure.

"What I think is that we had the really bad news and then we picked ourselves up."

He wants to use his time to ensure that none of them will regret the future.

"We don't keep our heads in the sand and pretend it doesn't happen.

"But it is about making sure that we do not keep discarding what we really want to do in life, and not regret what we did not do later and when it is too late.

"It's not a & # 39; bucket list & # 39; because I don't want this to kill me – I'm dying on my own terms."


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