Home Health & # 39; This is Dementia & # 39; Documentary Premiers Thursday...

& # 39; This is Dementia & # 39; Documentary Premiers Thursday on Netflix

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It is advertised as a sensitive look at the causes of dementia, the misinformation surrounding the illness and the individual and personal experiences of people touched by it. "This is dementia" Thursday will award on Netflix examining the experiences of a man as a dementia educator, academic researcher and nephew of a dementia patient.

"This is dementia"

(Photo courtesy of Dr. John DenBoer)

The public will be able to hear from someone who has both witnessed dementia in his family and has the medical experience to offer concrete facts about the disease. That man is the neuropsychologist Dr. John DenBoer, a US-based dementia researcher and the creator of Smart Brain Aging– A company that helps delay the onset of dementia and reduce its severity through a science-supported brain training program. DenBoer works in dementia detection area at an early stage, specializing in the development of intervention mechanisms to help prevent further development of the dementia process.

He was studying geriatric neuropsychiatry in 2004 at the University of Montana (UM) and was about to go to the VA Boston Healthcare System to complete his internship when his grandmother began developing dementia. "It was then that I began to get interested in how to identify dementia in advance and how to prevent it from getting worse." Since then he has named his non-profit organization, the Jean Seeling Dementia Prevention Foundation.

Neuropsychologist Dr. John DenBoer

(Photo courtesy of Dr. John DenBoer)

DenBoer said: "While the documentary is a personal story about my grandmother and me, it really focuses on how my story is like everyone else's story. It is not absolutely unique. It is a shared story. Dementia is a disease terrible. It takes what we value most: our independence, dignity and time. For me this is a spiritual and personal mission. "

"There's so much misinformation around dementia – especially among the older generations," DenBoer said. "Throughout their lives, they have heard all kinds of information on dementia and now they are not sure what to believe. Fortunately, we have a much clearer picture of the many causes of different types of dementia. The trick is to get accurate information out there . "

One of the greatest myths about dementia, says DenBoer, is that it is a normal part of aging. "You can ask someone if they believe it, and they will tell you they don't, but I think it's a deeply seeded, almost philosophical principle that people believe they believe dementia to be inevitable," he said. "We do not cure heart disease or cancer or diabetes in this way. People would not say that those diseases are inevitable. Most people do preventive health care for them."

In his documentary, DeBoer emphasizes the widespread opinion that Robin Williams suffered from undiagnosed dementia before his untimely death. The film also includes other celebrities – such as Samuel L Jackson, Seth Rogen and Hector Eliondo – who share their personal experiences of the disease.

"Almost everyone I talk to has been touched by dementia in some way – a partner, friend or family member," says DenBoer. "People want to know how to help, what they can do to support someone who lives with the disease. But the most important thing is that they want to hear someone with a personal experience of assisting a person with dementia, not just another I hope this documentary will offer understanding, education and above all hope to people living with dementia ".

As we age, the cells die and the body ages. But dementia is something else. Accelerated aging of the brain compared to the rest of the body, dementia ages the brain faster than usual causing the narrowing of certain brain regions, especially in the middle brain where memories are stored. There are different types of dementia based on causality. For example, Alzheimer's disease is caused by an abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brain, DeBoer said.

"With more people living longer and a falling birth rate, there will be fewer healthy young people paying for health coverage, dementia could cause a funding crisis in the coming years if left unchecked," DenBoer said . He cited the following facts for the reasons of his decision to create a documentary to educate others about dementia:

  • Someone develops Alzheimer's every 65 seconds.
  • Dementia affects 47 million people worldwide.
  • The number of cases should triple in the next 10-15 years.
  • Dementia is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more lives than those combined between prostate and breast cancer.

DenBoer said his documentary should appeal to all ages, as everyone has an interest in the outcome of dementia research. "One in three people in the world will continue to develop dementia. So it will affect them one way or another very intimately and quite significantly," he said. "Given the statistics, most people will know someone who will have dementia if they don't take it for themselves."

"This is Dementia" will also be premier at FilmBar at 815 N 2nd St., in Phoenix, Arizona and on Amazon, Hulu, iTunes and Google Play on Thursday 11th August.

For more information on DenBoer's SMART Memory Program® with SMART Brain Aging, click here.

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It is advertised as a sensitive look at the causes of dementia, the misinformation surrounding the illness and the individual and personal experiences of people touched by it. "This is dementia" Thursday will award on Netflix examining the experiences of a man as a dementia educator, academic researcher and nephew of a dementia patient.

"This is dementia"

(Photo courtesy of Dr. John DenBoer)

The public will be able to hear from someone who has both witnessed dementia in his family and has the medical experience to offer concrete facts about the disease. That man is the neuropsychologist Dr. John DenBoer, a US-based dementia researcher and the creator of Smart Brain Aging– A company that helps delay the onset of dementia and reduce its severity through a science-supported brain training program. DenBoer works in dementia detection area at an early stage, specializing in the development of intervention mechanisms to help prevent further development of the dementia process.

He was studying geriatric neuropsychiatry in 2004 at the University of Montana (UM) and was about to go to the VA Boston Healthcare System to complete his internship when his grandmother began developing dementia. "It was then that I began to get interested in how to identify dementia in advance and how to prevent it from getting worse." Since then he has named his non-profit organization, the Jean Seeling Dementia Prevention Foundation.

Neuropsychologist Dr. John DenBoer

(Photo courtesy of Dr. John DenBoer)

DenBoer said: "While the documentary is a personal story about my grandmother and me, it really focuses on how my story is like everyone else's story. It is not absolutely unique. It is a shared story. Dementia is a disease terrible. It takes what we value most: our independence, dignity and time. For me this is a spiritual and personal mission. "

"There's so much misinformation around dementia – especially among the older generations," DenBoer said. "Throughout their lives, they have heard all kinds of information on dementia and now they are not sure what to believe. Fortunately, we have a much clearer picture of the many causes of different types of dementia. The trick is to get accurate information out there . "

One of the greatest myths about dementia, says DenBoer, is that it is a normal part of aging. "You can ask someone if they believe it, and they will tell you they don't, but I think it's a deeply seeded, almost philosophical principle that people believe they believe dementia to be inevitable," he said. "We do not cure heart disease or cancer or diabetes in this way. People would not say that those diseases are inevitable. Most people do preventive health care for them."

In his documentary, DeBoer emphasizes the widespread opinion that Robin Williams suffered from undiagnosed dementia before his untimely death. The film also includes other celebrities – such as Samuel L Jackson, Seth Rogen and Hector Eliondo – who share their personal experiences of the disease.

"Almost everyone I talk to has been touched by dementia in some way – a partner, friend or family member," says DenBoer. "People want to know how to help, what they can do to support someone who lives with the disease. But the most important thing is that they want to hear someone with a personal experience of assisting a person with dementia, not just another I hope this documentary will offer understanding, education and above all hope to people living with dementia ".

As we age, the cells die and the body ages. But dementia is something else. Accelerated aging of the brain compared to the rest of the body, dementia ages the brain faster than usual causing the narrowing of certain brain regions, especially in the middle brain where memories are stored. There are different types of dementia based on causality. For example, Alzheimer's disease is caused by an abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brain, DeBoer said.

"With more people living longer and a falling birth rate, there will be fewer healthy young people paying for health coverage, dementia could cause a funding crisis in the coming years if left unchecked," DenBoer said . He cited the following facts for the reasons of his decision to create a documentary to educate others about dementia:

  • Someone develops Alzheimer's every 65 seconds.
  • Dementia affects 47 million people worldwide.
  • The number of cases should triple in the next 10-15 years.
  • Dementia is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more lives than those combined between prostate and breast cancer.

DenBoer said his documentary should appeal to all ages, as everyone has an interest in the outcome of dementia research. "One in three people in the world will continue to develop dementia. So it will affect them one way or another very intimately and quite significantly," he said. "Given the statistics, most people will know someone who will have dementia if they don't take it for themselves."

"This is Dementia" will also be premier at FilmBar at 815 N 2nd St., in Phoenix, Arizona and on Amazon, Hulu, iTunes and Google Play on Thursday 11th August.

For more information on DenBoer's SMART Memory Program® with SMART Brain Aging, click here.

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